News

SUSPENSION OF SERVICES IN NOTHERN IRELAND

To all Ministers, GPC, and Congregational Office bearers
 
7th January 2021
STAY AT HOME
 
Dear Colleagues, Church Members and Friends, 
 
The following is an update from the Irish Council of Churches.
 
You may be aware that there was a briefing for the faith sector organised by the Executive Office for this afternoon. The Chief Medical Officer (CMO) and Chief Scientific Advisor (CSA) were present.

 While acknowledging the significant benefits to people of faith of gathering for worship, it was their clear advice that in light of the very difficult situation in which we find ourselves, there would be significant public health benefit for churches and the wider community if services were to return to online-only for the coming weeks. 

The Executive meets tomorrow and may or may not decide to introduce legislation relating to public worship. However, regardless of the Executive decision, the Catholic Church, Presbyterian Church, Methodist Church and Church of Ireland  have decided to move to online provision, as has the Moravian Church worldwide, the Salvation Army and several of our own churches,  in light of the very clear public health guidance from the CMO and CSA.
 
The Rt Rev Chris Hudson (Moderator) and the Clerk endorse and commend these actions for the same reason and in turn would request that all our Churches suspend their public worship and move, where possible, to online formats until the 6th February when the matter can be reviewed.
The exceptions would be for weddings, funerals, recording and/or live-streaming, drive-in services and private prayer (as permitted by regulations)
 
The text of the notices issued by the Presbyterian Church, Church of Ireland and Catholic Church is provided below for your information.
 
Yours in the Lord 
Chris and Robert
 
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Worsening situation: Church decides to close

 This afternoon (7 January) the Northern Ireland Executive’s ‘Faith Leaders’ Forum’ was convened by Junior Ministers, Gordon Lyons MLA and Declan Kearney MLA. In light of the advice that church leaders and other faith leaders received during the meeting from Dr Michael McBride, the Chief Medical Officer (CMO), and Professor Ian Young, Chief Scientific Advisor (CSA), regarding the worsening Coronavirus situation, the Presbyterian Church in Ireland (PCI) has decided that all in person Sunday gatherings for worship, along with most other in person church gatherings, should cease in all PCI congregations from midnight tonight until Saturday, 6 February 2021.

 Speaking on behalf of the denomination, the Clerk of the General Assembly and General Secretary of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland, said, “Our churches are part of the local community and we recognise the very serious situation that Northern Ireland finds itself in today. With the extremely high level of transmission of the Covid-19 virus, combined with the numbers in hospital and intensive care, the very clear warning from the CMO and CSA this afternoon was that over the next number of weeks this situation is going to worsen significantly.”

 Mr Gribben continued, “In light of our ongoing consultations and the current serious and worsening situation, and in line with unequivocal public health guidance that people should stay at home, we have written to our congregations in Northern Ireland, informing them that all in person Sunday gatherings for worship, along with most other in person church gatherings, should cease in all PCI congregations from midnight tonight until Saturday, 6 February 2021.

 “It is of course regrettable and disappointing that over these next few weeks our congregations will no longer be physically gathering for worship. However, because of the alarming rise of Covid-19 infections in the community, this is the right decision to take, both for the safety and protection of people and also to contribute to the overall reduction of inter-person contact in line with the government’s ‘stay at home’ message.”

 The Clerk concluded by saying, “In these difficult days, as we continue to look to God, and encourage others to find their hope in Him, let us help and pray for one another, lifting up all those on the frontline, those in authority making difficult decisions and especially all who mourn and miss loved ones.”

 Colleagues in the Church of Ireland, Methodist Church in Ireland, and Roman Catholic Church, are making similar statements at this time.

 Ends.

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Statement from the Church of Ireland Bishops
in Northern Ireland in relation to Public Worship 

Following further briefing today by the Chief Medical Officer, Dr Michael McBride, and the Chief Scientific Advisor, Professor Ian Young, and in consultation with the Executive Office, as Church Leaders we fully recognise the very serious position that Northern Ireland finds itself in at this time with the extremely high level of transmission of the Covid-19 virus.  The escalation of numbers in hospital and intensive care is placing immense pressure on our healthcare staff; the number of deaths, and the very clear warning from health officials that over the next weeks, the situation is going to worsen significantly, is of grave concern to us all.
 
We recognise that clergy and parishioners have together worked steadily to implement protocols which have ensured that public gatherings for worship have been as safe as possible since the re-opening of our buildings in early summer. We also appreciate that the Northern Ireland Executive has acknowledged over the last 10 months the importance of people being able to gather in person for worship.  The ongoing engagement between faith communities and the Northern Ireland Executive is warmly welcomed and is something which we believe has been, and continues to be, of benefit to wider society.
 
However, in light of the current serious and worsening situation and in line with clear public health guidance that people should stay at home, we have decided that all public gatherings for worship and all other in-person church activities should cease for our particular denomination, until Saturday, 6th February 2021, subject to review in late January, with the exception of weddings, funerals, arrangements for recording and/or live-streaming, drive-in services and private prayer (as permitted by regulations). We note and welcome the fact that the same position has been adopted by the Presbyterian Church, Roman Catholic Church, Methodist Church and others in Northern Ireland.
 
In making this decision for the ‘greater good’ of all within our community, we continue to remember in our prayers the sick and bereaved, all who are suffering, and those whose lives have been directly impacted by Covid-19, praying too for those in positions of responsibility who are faced with making difficult decisions at this challenging time.
 
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Catholic Bishops of Northern Ireland: “As many people as possible stay at home for the sake of health, life and the Common Good”
 
·         “Faith and prayer can be a tremendous support to individuals and society during these difficult times”
 
Statement
Following further briefing today by the Chief Medical Officer and the Chief Scientific Officer, and in consultation with The Executive Office, we are very concerned at the current serious public health position in which Northern Ireland finds itself: with the extremely high level of transmission of the Covid-19 virus; the continuing escalation of numbers in hospital and intensive care; the number of associated deaths; and, the increasingly unsustainable pressure on our healthcare staff.  The clear message from health officials is that this situation is going to worsen significantly over the coming weeks.

 We recognise the efforts of so many in our parishes who have been working to ensure that our gatherings for public worship are as safe as possible and we welcome the continuing engagement between the faith communities and the NI Executive which has led to consensus between us on the importance of people being able to gather in person for worship.  At this time, however, we acknowledge and support the unequivocal message from public health authorities that the movement and gathering of people should be minimised and that as many people as possible stay at home for the sake of health, life and the Common Good.

 In light of our ongoing consultations and of the current serious and worsening situation, and in line with clear public health guidance that people should stay at home, we have decided that for a limited period (from midnight on Thursday 7 January until Saturday 6 February 2021, subject to review in late January), the celebration of the Eucharist and other liturgies should take place without the physical presence of the faithful - with the exception of marriage, funeral, baptismal liturgies and drive-in services (subject to regulations).  Arrangements for recording and/or livestreaming, and making individual visits for private prayer are also permissible in accordance with regulations.  We encourage parishes, where possible, to continue to broadcast the celebration of Mass - and other devotions and prayer services - online and on other media, knowing that faith and prayer can be a tremendous support to individuals and society during these difficult times. 

 We make this decision reluctantly, conscious that not being able to gather for public worship can cause pain for all the faithful, but in the hope that this limited period of sacrifice will be for the protection of life and health and for the greater good of all.  We once more ask for prayers for the sick, the bereaved and all those whose livelihoods have been particularly impacted by the pandemic.  We keep in our prayers all health workers, carers, chaplains and other essential workers.  We welcome the announcement that a similar position is being taken by the leaders of the Church of Ireland, the Presbyterian Church in Ireland, the Methodist Church in Ireland and many other denominations and faith communities in response to the unequivocal message from public health authorities that as many people as possible stay at home at this time.


Rev Robert A McKee
Clerk of General Synod 
(Non-Subscribing Presbyterian Church of Ireland)

SEPTEMBER MAGAZINE

IMG 20201127 081130Dear Friends

The SEPTEMBER edition of the Non-Subsribing Presbyterian Magazine is available.  The Table of Contents appears below. 

If you are interested in subscribing to receive the magazine, please be in contact with Rev. Heather Walker at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 
COVER PHOTO: Our Belfast All Souls Church building is situated on Elmwood Avenue – voted 'The Prettiest Street in Belfast’ by the travel website ‘Ireland Before You Die’. They rightfully pointed out tha it is at it’s best in Autumn.
 

Contents

Editorial - 2
Too much space, not enough time – 3
News of the Churches – 5
The Hymns we sang together No 7 -9
Social Services
A selection of virtual worship and inspiration from our Churches’ Social Media sites.
Time for a story with Rev. Sue Steers: Navigation – 16
Children’s Corner – 17
Online Ministry Links and Addresses – 18
 
EDITORIAL - By Rev. Heather Walker

It has been lovely to receive more ‘news from the churches’ as services begin to get underway in many of our churches. Most of the photos attached are also available on the Facebook pages of the denomination or individual congregations, should you wish to see them in colour. There are a great array of masks on display!

As we come into September we also think of schools starting back, and those beginning a new school, or sending a child or grandchild to nursery for the first time. This is always a stressful event, even at the best of times; and this is a particularly nerve-wracking year. Pray for neighbours, friends and family in this situation: for protection, and the peace of God which passes understanding.

We also remember all the events and activities that should have been beginning and are still on hold. Choirs, bowling leagues, prayer groups, parent-and-toddler mornings; things which seem small in the grand scheme of things, yet were central to the social and emotional wellbeing of many. We pray for those feeling lonely and disconnected from their world. 

It is perhaps a little like the disciples between the ascension and the coming of the Spirit at Pentecost: life seems uncertain, we question our actions and the directions given to us. We struggle to adapt to a new way of doing things - sanitising and donning masks before entering a shop, elbow-bumping instead of shaking hands - we wonder if we are interpreting the instructions given to us by our leader correctly (do we wait in Jerusalem for the Comforter, or do we ‘go into all the world?’). Yet as time passed, they became stronger and more confident, until, with the dynamic strength of the comforter they were finding the balance between public engagement and peer-group ‘bubbling’. They continued to learn and grow, evolve and adapt to new and unforeseen challenges; rooting themselves in their scriptures and their personal knowledge of Jesus’ character and actions. If we can model ourselves on that group of faithful disciples, whose stories stretch across the gospels and Acts, and whose wisdom, experience and vision fills the remaining sections of our New Testament; perhaps we too can negotiate these uncharted waters, acknowledging that we are ‘learning as we go’, but following the Teacher and Comforter of us all.

Yours in Christ,

Heather.

November Magazine

November Mag coverDear Friends

The NOVEMBER edition of the Non-Subsribing Presbyterian Magazine is available.  The Table of Contents appears below. 

If you are interested in subscribing to receive the magazine, please be in contact with Rev. Heather Walker at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 
COVER PHOTO: 
 
Despite services being smaller in size at the moment, they are still filled with heart and spirit. Many of our Churches had beautiful harvest arrangements, including this autumn-themed centrepiece in Killinchy. 
 
CONTENTS
 
Editorial    2
On Circumspection   3
Christian Aid Christmas Appeal   5
New of the Churches   7
Social services    10
-A selection of virtual worship and inspiration from our Churches' Social Media sites. 
Children's Corner     23
The Hymns We Sang Together    24
Obituaries     25
Online Ministry Links and Addresses    26
 
EDITORIAL - REV. HEATHER WALKER

If nothing else, 2020 has been a good year for memories!  We have certainly made some new ones, and it will be interesting to see how the various country across the world will be remembered by future generations for their response to Covid-19 throughout the year.  We might, in future years, remember having to go back to the car to pick up a mask before entering a shop.  We might talk of the great ‘toilet-paper shortage’ or the ‘Rise of Deliveroo’.  We might have new reasons to laugh at ourselves as a species; or the memories might be sharper: painful and sorrow filled.  As we come through November, many families are facing their first Christmas without a familiar face within the home.  Perhaps Remembrance Day this year will be more poignant than most as we, like those on the first Armistice Day, struggle to comprehend the number of casualties and deaths, and are unaware of the lasting effects on global politics, economics and mental health.  As we stand to remember the fallen, will our minds turn also to the medical staff in the beleaguered hospitals and care homes?  The frontline workers trying to keep the supply chains running and prevent food poverty compounding the problems of isolation and vulnerability?  The grieving, the anxious, the despairing and hopeless; those who blame the government and those who blame God.  All those, in fact, that Jesus shared with throughout His life and ministry.  Is our society now so very different to the one into which Christ was born?  Are the people we interact with (masked and socially distanced, of course) totally removed from those who called for His crucifixion, or wept at His tomb?  I would be inclined to think not.  I remember His words of compassion to all: words of comfort, forgiveness and challenge.  I remember the lives He changed and the visions He inspired; the social norms He dispelled and the outcasts He touched.  I wonder how we can best honour that memory; and recognise that all we can try to do is continue walking within that legacy, reaching out to those who are broken and offering compassion to those exhausted by the trials of this year.

I loved viewing and receiving photographs of harvest food bank donations alongside the colourful displays of fruit and flowers this year; a reminder that we do look beyond the trappings of ‘church’ to the substance of the social gospel: making a positive difference in the lives of those it is within our power to help, in the Name of Jesus.  We remember those in need, not with pity but with practicality; not to degrade, but to dignify.  In doing this, we show love and fulfil the Lord requirement from Micah 6:8: ‘to do justice, and love merciful-kindness and to walk humbly with your God’.

Yours in Christ.

Heather.

 

Republic of Ireland Update - Cork & Dublin Churches

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND UPDATE - CORK & DUBLIN UNITARIAN CHURCHES

DUE TO COVID RESTRICTIONS, ALL CHURCHES IN THE REPUBLIC OF IRELAND HAVE HAD TO MOVE TO ONLINE SERVICES. 

CORK UNITARIAN -  continues to broadcast Sunday Services, Night Prayer and Reflections which can be found on the Facebook Site - Click Here

DUBLIN UNITARIAN - Information on Dublin services can be found on their website NEWS PAGE  as well as on their HOME PAGE.